Curriculum Guide for The Museum of Tolerance, Los Angeles                                                                                                                        

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HITLER LETTER:  UNDERSTANDING THE RHETORIC OF HATE

A 4-page letter signed by Adolf Hitler, dated September 16, 1919, six years before the publication of Mein Kampf, describes his hatred of Jews outlining his plans which call for “the uncompromising removal of the Jews altogether.”  In this lesson, students will use ethos, pathos, and logos to analyze the letter in an effort to understand the rhetoric of hate.








CROSSING THE LINE:  HIGH SCHOOL RELATIONS AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION

The Crossing The Line comic strip is presented behind the Point of View Diner in the Museum of Tolerance.  Dealing with inter-group relations, it is a sad story of violence and scapegoating with an unresolved ending.  Students are to create and illustrate in graphic novel form a peaceful resolution to the inter-group conflict utilizing King’s Six Principles of Nonviolence.








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GLOBALHATE.COM:  SPREADING HATE

Hate is all around us.  It’s an odd thing to state, but it is true.  And it might be truer than most of us even realize.  Hate is not only readily available because of the Internet, but also from the many hate groups throughout the United States and the rest of the world.  These hate groups create a culture for themselves through symbols and music, and this lesson explores the many avenues of hate.








PARA TODOS LOS NINOS:  IMPORTANT RULINGS ON SCHOOL SEGREGATION AND THE IMPACT TODAY

Most students have heard of Brown v. Board of Education, the historic 1954 Supreme Court ruling that officially ended segregation in public schools.  Likewise, most students understand that the plaintiffs, the Brown family, were an African-American family.  Students usually are not familiar, however, with an important case in 1947, before Brown v. Board of Education:  Mendez v. Westminster School District.  In this case a Mexican-American family fought to integrate schools in California.  During this project, students will research segregation in the mid-20th century and learn of the key roles Latinos have played, together with African-Americans, in the continuing battles for civil rights for all Americans.




RESISTING INJUSTICES THROUGH THE POWER OF WRITING

The Remember the Children exhibit in the Museum of Tolerance features many unique artifacts relating to children’s experiences in the Holocaust.  This lesson focuses on those that involve writing.  Through reading the Bella Blitz letter, a poem from a notebook by Abram Cytryn, and excerpts from the Anne Frank diary, students will see that writing, organizing, telling, and documenting are forms of resistance.








MEDIA LITERACY:  PROPAGANDA TECHNIQUES IN HISTORY AND TODAY

This lesson looks at how the Nazis recruited young people through the use of propaganda techniques. After obtaining a general understanding of these techniques, students will be asked to apply them to today’s marketing to teenagers.










PEACEMAKERS PHRASE POEM

One way to present impressions you have while at the Museum of Tolerance is to write a phrase poem.  To create a phrase poem, take words and phrases that you feel impact you from your visit through the Museum and then arrange them by making changes in spacing and lines to create a new meaning.  You can do this alone or each person in your group can find a phrase that impacts him or her and you can all create a summary phrase poem together.









© Jeff Sapp 2015